fuds1

The above picture shows what I ate for dinner on July 24: a big salad, a cup of cottage cheese, cherries, and sliced peppers.

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This picture above shows what I ate for dinner on July 9: a big salad, a cup of cottage cheese, cherries, and sliced peppers.

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This picture above shows what I ate for dinner on June 12: a big salad, a cup of cottage cheese, cherries, and sliced peppers.

I didn’t take pictures of what I ate for dinner in between those dates, but I assure you that 9 times out of 10 it looked pretty much exactly like this.

Because you are all perceptive, by now you have begun to notice two things:

1. There are some key similarities between my meals.
2. The way I eat is incredibly boring.

It’s not only me. The way most people eat is incredibly boring.  Honestly.  But me especially, because most of the time my dinner is exactly the fucking same.  Lunch sometimes varies. Dinner is very much the same.

I feel self-conscious about it sometimes.  I have lots of friends out there who enjoy eating new foods and who issue calls for new recipes all the time.  I have some friends whose eating habits are fraught with dramatic plot twists.  I sometimes pop over to a blog called Nom Nom Paleo, updated with new and interesting paleo-style fuds. Every day it’s something new there.  Every fucking day.  (Seriously, every-fucking-day.)  But me, I eat the same thing all the time, with very little variation.

It gets even more boring.  I’ve found that I eat at almost exactly the same hours every day.  It’s not something I planned, but it ended up that way.  You could set your watch by me.  If it’s 9 a.m. Eastern time, I’m eating eggs.  If it’s 5 p.m., I’m eating fruit.  If it’s sometime between 6:30 and 7 p.m., I’m eating that cottage cheese.  And mark my words: every Friday through Tuesday at precisely 8:30 p.m., wherever you are, know that I am at that very moment dressing and shaking a salad.

Since I’ve been doing sort of OK with this weight loss thing so far, a bunch of people have asked me what and how I eat.  And I feel weird telling them that I’ve essentially eaten the same damn dinner at the same time, day in and day out for months, because that doesn’t seem very enticing.  I’m not looking for converts, but I sure as hell wouldn’t get any with that strategy anyway.  If I had taken a picture of my dinner every day, it would be the world’s most static, uninteresting flipbook.

What may be weirder is this: I don’t have a problem with it at all.  In fact, I like it.  Please don’t start dropping recipes my way, thinking I’m bored.  I’m not.  I just think it’s boring to other people.  My dinner salads are delicious, filling, I love them, they’re easy to eat at my desk while I work, portable, fast to make, and they give me lots of balanced nutritious food.  So therefore I don’t see much point in making something else.

Eating the same thing every day means I never wonder what to make for dinner. Wondering what to make for dinner sometimes results in new and interesting adventures, and just as often results in indecision.  Indecision leads to procrastination.  When I procrastinate, I scramble.  When I scramble, I start thinking about giving up and having crappy food instead.  When I start thinking about having crappy food, I make lousy choices, because I end up saying, “Aw, fuck it — it’s late and I have to eat something.  Let’s just keep eating cheese until the package is empty.”

I should make it clear that I’m not saying what I do is better.1  I’m not opposed to eating differently — I just don’t.  Eating in a boring way is what I do at the moment, and I’m quite satisfied and  happy with it, and it works for me.  And if you ask how I eat or what I eat, you’ll be bored off your ass and think, “There’s no way in hell I’m doing that because it sounds terrible.”  I don’t have very fun advice. Sorry.

I could very well switch tomorrow. I could suddenly wake up and think, “Jesus, if I have to eat one more salad with 6 ounces of salmon in it, just one more, I’m going to set an orphanage on fire.”  So far that hasn’t happened.  I don’t know if it will.  If there’s an orphanage fire in the news, you’ll know I decided to try a new recipe.*

  1. There’s a small scientific study that says eating the same foods over and over can lead to weight loss — but it’s a tiny study, so I don’t really put much stock into it.